Avatar 2: So good is the 3D technique of the sequel

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     Most recently Gemini Man used a bold new technique with Will Smith. The film could thus be shown in 120 frames per second. Avatar Creator James Cameron is not particularly convinced of the method. Still, he wants to use them in Avatar 2 and 3, at least with one caveat. Here's how Cameron adapted the technique of star director Ang Lee.
    In terms of content, Gemini Man saw himself as a child of the 90s. In the shots of the scenes but technically new standards were set. One of these is the HFR (High Frame Rate), which showed the film at 120 frames per second. Instead of the usual 24 frames per second, there were five times as much image information. For many, the HFR is a step towards the future. Film visionary James Cameron is totally different.
    Cameron often uses 3D camera pans in 3D for his films. HFR could indeed support these recordings, but for him is not a proper format. The director reports in an interview: "I have my own philosophy when it comes to HFR, and I think that it is nothing more than a specific solution to a specific problem that has to do with 3D can solve the problems of 3D projection, but I do not think it will be the next big thing. "
    Although Cameron is skeptical, he has already used the method in films like Terminator and even Titanic. For Avatar 2 and 3 HFR will also be used in places. The reason for this is that the films play only partially in our reality. "When you're doing extraordinary things in real or CGI-style fashion, this tool will help you with the hyper-reality of a movie," says Cameron. Bottom line, this means for Cameron: HFR should generally be avoided, but in scenes full of CGI it can increase the realism.
    How much of the method we'll see in the Avatar sequels is likely to be secondary. Cameron has often proved that his own technique can lure the masses to the cinemas. Avatar 2 will be shown on 15 December 2021. The theatrical release for Avatar 3 should then follow on 20 December 2023.
    Source: Collider

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